Andrea Wagemans: Negotiating different innovation logics in entrepreneurial journalism: looking beyond the perceived naturalness of open innovation

Andrea Wagemans | University of Groningen, Institute for the Study of Culture (ICOG) | Supervisors: Prof. dr. T.A.C. (Tamara) Witschge and R. (Robert) Prey, PhD | September 2017 – September 2021 |  j.m.wagemans[at]rug.nl

Negotiating different innovation logics in entrepreneurial journalism: looking beyond the perceived naturalness of open innovation

Through a detailed study of innovation processes, this research proposal aims to gain insight into how networked ways of working within new journalism initiatives function in day-to-day practice. Based on the idea that innovation thrives in a context where a diversity of actors collaborate (see o.a. Blomqvist and Levy, 2006; Nieto and Santamaria, 2007; Ketchen e.a., 2007), this proposal researches how collaborations and negotiations between partners take place and what they result in.

Triggered by Anderson’s (2013: 163) observation that “news networks do not appear out of nowhere”, this project explores where networks come from, how these fragmented work configurations are formed, who is included and who is not, and how negotiations are taking place between the different participants in those configurations that lead to specific decisions being made.

While collaboration is seen as something almost ‘natural’ (use of terms like ecosystem (Anderson, 2013; Anderson, 2016)) and predominantly open (use of terms like collaborative innovation (Gloor, 2006) and open innovation (Chesbrough, 2003)), I address issues that are left under-explored in the field, such as the openness of the networks, the diversity of the actors actually included, the diversity of their ideas and how actors manage to bridge their differences and reach agreements about the intended results of the collaborations.

The central research question is: How do innovation networks in journalism form, what are the practices constituting the collaborations, and what role do diversity of actors, motives and ideas play in the actual collaboration and its outcomes?

As a participant-observer in the INJECT project I will have a unique opportunity to study an innovation process from up close. In combination with analyses of in-depth interviews, this will offer a better understanding of how innovation processes work in journalism specifically, but also of the role of networks in innovation more generally.